The Sweet Benefits of Cranberry Concentrate…and How to Make It.

Cranberries are a wonder drug.  I mean, food.  They provide many necessary benefits to our bodies:

  • Boost immunity with their high antioxidant levels
  • Promote and maintain bladder and kidney health
  • Help relieve stress and lift dipping moods
  • Support brain function and boost memory, similar to cilantro
  • Aid in keeping heart disease at bay
  • Assist in dental health, and more

Even though you may be tempted to reach for the jug of highly sweetened cranberry juice when you get a uti (bladder infection), the sugar level in these commercially available juices negate nearly all of the benefits that the tart cranberry has to offer.

You can certainly make your own fresh cranberry juice, but I prefer having Cranberry Concentrate on hand.  Inspired to create a “cranberry something” that my uti-prone feline* could, and would, consume (read: something I could sneak into wet cat food and get away with it), I came up with this super “clean”, easy and inexpensive cranberry puree.

Here’s how to make it:

CRANBERRY CONCENTRATE

1 12 oz. bag fresh cranberries.  It’s ok to use frozen berries that have thawed slightly.

1/4 – 1/2 cup filtered water, divided

Pour 1/4 cup water into blender.  Add cranberries.  Whiz up to a puree consistency.  If blender is working too hard or berry mix seems too ‘dry’, add 1 Tbsp. of water at a time, then blend again, to arrive at a thick, yet spoonable paste.

Pour into glass container and cover with lid.  Refrigerate.  Keeps for several months and can also be frozen.

* For cats: I mixed 1/4 tsp. of cranberry concentrate into 2 Tbsp. wet cat food along with a bit of yogurt to mask the tartness.

For the humans: Don’t make this just for the cats in your life!  Add 1-2 tsp. puree to yogurt, smoothies, and fresh juices to balance acid/alkaline levels and increase health.  Adjust the amount to meet your pucker limit!

While Cranberry Concentrate is not sweet in flavor, the benefits are a super sweet deal.

*Legal Lingo:  Before giving any food or herbal preparation to cats, dogs or other domesticated pets, check with your veterinarian.  None of the suggestions in this post are intended to diagnose, treat or prescribe medical conditions in cats or other creatures.

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These statements are provided for informational and educational purposes only and have been neither approved nor refuted by the Food and Drug Administration. Any advice and/or products mentioned should not be used to diagnose, treat, or prevent any illness. Consult your healthcare professional if you have a health condition, are pregnant, or are currently taking medication before using any products or applying any of this information. Iris Healing Arts, LLC and Heather Michet cannot be held responsible for the misuse of essential oils, products, or any of the therapeutic methods presented herein.